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Effective Mental Health Screening in Adolescents: Should We Collect Data from Youth, Parents or Both?

Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 2017 Jun, Vol.48(3), pp.385-392 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Effective Mental Health Screening in Adolescents: Should We Collect Data from Youth, Parents or Both?
  • Author: Kuhn, C ; Aebi, M ; Jakobsen, H ; Banaschewski, T ; Poustka, L ; Grimmer, Y ; Goodman, R ; Steinhausen, HC
  • Found In: Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 2017 Jun, Vol.48(3), pp.385-392 [Peer Reviewed Journal]
  • Subjects: Youth -- Psychological Aspects ; Mental Health -- Psychological Aspects ; Health Screening -- Psychological Aspects ; Psychiatric Hospitals -- Psychological Aspects ; Adolescence -- Psychological Aspects ; Psychotherapy -- Psychological Aspects
  • Language: English
  • Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10578-016-0665-0 Byline: Christine Kuhn (1), Marcel Aebi (1,2,3), Helle Jakobsen (4), Tobias Banaschewski (5), Luise Poustka (6), Yvonne Grimmer (5), Robert Goodman (7), Hans-Christoph Steinhausen (1,4,8) Keywords: Adolescent psychopathology; Screening; Multi-informants; SDQ; DAWBA Abstract: Youth- and parent-rated screening measures derived from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) were compared on their psychometric properties as predictors of caseness in adolescence (mean age 14). Successful screening was judged firstly against the likelihood of having an ICD-10 psychiatric diagnosis and secondly by the ability to discriminate between community (N = 252) and clinical (N = 86) samples (sample status). Both, SDQ and DAWBA measures adequately predicted the presence of an ICD-10 disorder as well as sample status. The hypothesis that there was an informant gradient was confirmed: youth self-reports were less discriminating than parent reports, whereas combined parent and youth reports were more discriminating--a finding replicated across a diversity of measures. When practical constraints only permit screening for caseness using either a parent or an adolescent informant, parents are the better source of information. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Psychiatry Zurich, Postbox 1482, 8032, Zurich, Switzerland (2) Child and Youth Forensic Psychiatry, Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University Hospital of Psychiatry, Zurich, Switzerland (3) Clinical Psychology for Children/Adolescents and Couples/Families, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland (4) Research Unit of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychiatric Hospital, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark (5) Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany (6) Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria (7) Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, King's College London Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, London, UK (8) Clinical Psychology and Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Article History: Registration Date: 17/06/2016 Online Date: 30/06/2016 Article note: Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s10578-016-0665-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0009-398X ; DOI: 10.1007/s10578-016-0665-0

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