skip to main content
Show Results with:

A case of prenatal diagnosis of fetal hydantoin syndrome by ultrasound

Genetics And Molecular Biology, 1999 Jun, Vol.22(2), pp.147-150 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

No full-text

  • Title:
    A case of prenatal diagnosis of fetal hydantoin syndrome by ultrasound
  • Author: Gollop, Tr ; Salzo, I
  • Found In: Genetics And Molecular Biology, 1999 Jun, Vol.22(2), pp.147-150 [Peer Reviewed Journal]
  • Subjects: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Genetics & Heredity ; Biology
  • Language: English
  • Description: Fetal hydantoin syndrome (FHS) is a set of disruptions occasionally present in fetuses exposed in utero to phenytoin or other anticonvulsants. Administration of phenytoin in early pregnancy may impair proper psychomotor performance expected for children's development. Several combined phenotypic markers delineate the syndrome, but the presence of single clinical signs is more common. There is controversy about the etiology of FHS. Associated disruptions may be related to a deficiency in a detoxifying enzyme (epoxide hydrolase), vascular problems, and/or factors not yet known. Genetic causes are believed to influence susceptibility to the drug. This text reports an unusual pattern of malformations detected in an ultrasound scan (gastroschisis, sacral meningomyelocele, and absence of the right lower limb) and in the anatomopathological study (left-side gastroschisis, sacral meningomyelocele, scoliosis, left clubfoot, absence of the right lower limb, and pectus carinatum) of a fetus whose mother took phenytoin. These defects may have been provoked by exposure to the drug during embryogenesis. In view of similar malformations observed in cases of prenatal exposure to cocaine, a recognized vasoconstrictor, it is suggested that vascular disruptions of hemodynamic origin constituted the event leading to some of the anomalies caused in the developing embryo. A complication of the chorionic villus sampling procedure, used for cytogenetic analysis, is another possibility.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1415-4757

Searching Remote Databases, Please Wait