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Embryonic cardiomyocyte, but not autologous stem cell transplantation, restricts infarct expansion, enhances ventricular function, and improves long-term survival

PLoS ONE, 2013, Vol.8(4), pp.e61510-1/10 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Embryonic cardiomyocyte, but not autologous stem cell transplantation, restricts infarct expansion, enhances ventricular function, and improves long-term survival
  • Author: Paulis, L.E.M. ; Klein, A.M. ; Ghanem, A. ; Geelen, T. ; Coolen, B.F. ; Breitbach, M. ; Zimmermann, K. ; Nicolay, K. ; Fleischmann, B.K. ; Roell, W. ; Strijkers, G.J.
  • Contributor: Biomedical NMR
  • Found In: PLoS ONE, 2013, Vol.8(4), pp.e61510-1/10 [Peer Reviewed Journal]
  • Subjects: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'T
  • Language: English
  • Description: Aims: Controversy exists in regard to the beneficial effects of transplanting cardiac or somatic progenitor cells upon myocardial injury. We have therefore investigated the functional short- and long-term consequences after intramyocardial transplantation of these cell types in a murine lesion model. Methods and Results: Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in mice (n = 75), followed by the intramyocardial injection of 1-2 x 10(5) luciferase- and GFP-expressing embryonic cardiomyocytes (eCMs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or medium into the infarct. Non-treated healthy mice (n = 6) served as controls. Bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging confirmed the engraftment and survival of the cells up to seven weeks postoperatively. After two weeks MRI was performed, which showed that infarct volume was significantly decreased by eCMs only (14.8 +/- 2.2% MI+eCM vs. 26.7 +/- 1.6% MI). Left ventricular dilation was significantly decreased by transplantation of any cell...
  • Identifier: ISSN: ; ISSN: 1932-6203

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