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Correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among HIV-positive pregnant women in rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa

Ramlagan, Shandir et al.

Journal of psychology in Africa: (South of the Sahara, the Caribbean and Afro-Latin America). Volume 29:Issue 2 (2019); pp 141-148 -- co-published by NISC (Pty) Ltd and Routledge, Informa UK Limited [trading as Taylor & Francis Group]

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  • Title:
    Correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among HIV-positive pregnant women in rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa
  • Author: Ramlagan, Shandir;
    Sifunda, Sibusiso;
    Peltzer, Karl;
    Jean, Jenny;
    Ruiter, Robert A.C.
  • Found In: Journal of psychology in Africa: (South of the Sahara, the Caribbean and Afro-Latin America). Volume 29:Issue 2 (2019); pp 141-148
  • Journal Title: Journal of psychology in Africa: (South of the Sahara, the Caribbean and Afro-Latin America)
  • Subjects: Blacks--Africa, Sub-Saharan--Psychology--Periodicals; Blacks--Latin America--Psychology--Periodicals; Psychology--Africa, Sub-Saharan--Periodicals; Psychology--Latin America--Periodicals; HIV--negative self-image--pregnant--stigma--women; Dewey: 155.8496
  • Rights: legaldeposit
  • Publication Details: co-published by NISC (Pty) Ltd and Routledge, Informa UK Limited [trading as Taylor & Francis Group]
  • Abstract: Abstract :

    The study investigated correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among 673 HIV-positive women from rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa (mean age 28 years old, SD = 5.73 years). The women completed measures of HIV-related stigma experience and related personal factors. Following multivariable logistic regression, results showed that lack of male involvement during the ante-natal visits was significantly associated with all four perceived HIV-related stigma factors. Lower income, intimate partner violence (IPV), lower education, and experienced HIV-related stigma were associated with a combination of the four components of perceived HIV-related stigma. From these findings, we conclude that higher levels of education, income, and partner involvement are protective factors against perceived HIV-related stigma, at multiple layers. Improving on adult education and income generating activities can help in reducing HIV-related stigma. Male partner involvement in their partner's pregnancy, the initiation of support groups for both women and men, as well as community-based IPV prevention interventions may help to reduce perceived HIV-related stigma among women living with HIV.


  • Identifier: System Number: LDEAvdc_100081812795.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 1433-0237; 10.1080/14330237.2019.1603022
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): ELD Digital store

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