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The cause-effect relationship between bone loss and Alzheimer's disease using statistical modeling

Loskutova, Natalia; Watts, Amber S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

Medical hypotheses. Volume 122 (2019); pp 92-97 -- Elsevier

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  • Title:
    The cause-effect relationship between bone loss and Alzheimer's disease using statistical modeling
  • Author: Loskutova, Natalia;
    Watts, Amber S.;
    Burns, Jeffrey M.
  • Found In: Medical hypotheses. Volume 122 (2019); pp 92-97
  • Journal Title: Medical hypotheses
  • Subjects: Médecine--Périodiques; Medicine--Periodicals; Medicine; Periodicals; Bone loss--Alzheimer's disease--Hypothalamus--CNS--Leptin--Statistical modeling; Dewey: 610
  • Rights: legaldeposit
  • Publication Details: Elsevier
  • Abstract: Abstract: Background:

    Animal studies provide strong evidence that the CNS directly regulates bone remodeling through the actions of the hypothalamus via two distinct pathways, the neural (mediated by leptin) arm and neurohumoral (mediated by neurohormones and growth factors) arm. The impact of AD on central regulatory mechanisms of bone mass is not known.

    Objectives:

    To test a model that assesses the relationship between hypothalamic atrophy and bone loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and potential mediation through neural (leptin) and neurohumoral (insulin-like growth factor –1, IGF-1) mechanisms.

    Hypotheses:

    AD-related hypothalamic structural change alters neural and neurohumoral regulatory systems of bone remodeling and contributes to bone loss in early AD.

    Design:

    A secondary data analysis of data obtained in a two-year longitudinal study with path analysis and longitudinal mediation modeling.

    Participants:

    The data were collected as a part of the University of Kansas Brain Aging Project, a two-year observational study of 71 older adults with early stage AD and 69 non-demented controls.

    Measurements:

    Demographic characteristics and measures of bone density, body composition, and hypothalamic volume, serum levels of leptin, growth hormone, and IGF-1 were collected.

    Results:

    Hypothalamic atrophy and bone loss were observed in AD group and were associated. Data modeling suggests that bone loss may precede measurable changes in the brain. Leptin increased over two years in AD and the increase in leptin was associated with hypothalamic atrophy. However, changes in leptin or IGF-1 levels did not mediate the relationship between hypothalamic atrophy and bone loss.

    Conclusions:

    This study extends previous findings by suggesting that bone loss in AD may be related to neurodegenerative changes (atrophy) in the hypothalamus. Further studies are needed to explore the role of brain atrophy and mediating mechanisms in bone loss. Further exploring temporal relationship between bone loss and AD may have an important diagnostic value.


  • Identifier: System Number: LDEAvdc_100074945311.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 0306-9877; 10.1016/j.mehy.2018.10.024
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): ELD Digital store

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