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Using expectancy-value theory to understand academic self-control

Galla, Brian M.; Amemiya, Jamie; Wang, Ming-Te

Learning and instruction. Volume 58 (2018); pp 22-33 -- Elsevier

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  • Title:
    Using expectancy-value theory to understand academic self-control
  • Author: Galla, Brian M.;
    Amemiya, Jamie;
    Wang, Ming-Te
  • Found In: Learning and instruction. Volume 58 (2018); pp 22-33
  • Journal Title: Learning and instruction
  • Subjects: Apprentissage--Périodiques; Enseignement--Périodiques; Electronic journals; Learning--Periodicals; Teaching--Periodicals; Learning; Periodicals; Teaching; Expectancy-value theory--Self-control--Motivation--Academic achievement; Dewey: 370.1
  • Rights: legaldeposit
  • Publication Details: Elsevier
  • Abstract: Abstract:

    We applied expectancy-value theory to understand academic self-control. In three studies of middle and high school students ( N total = 2620), subjective values, but not expectancy beliefs, predicted motivation and behavior toward academic activities over alternative activities. Moreover, results showed that intrinsic value was a stronger incremental predictor of academic self-control compared to utility value. Study 1 used experience sampling and showed that momentary perceptions of intrinsic value were more strongly associated with motivational conflict during engagement in academic activities compared to perceptions of utility value. Study 2 used daily diaries and demonstrated that intrinsic value predicted greater self-control for homework over 14 days. Study 3 was a longitudinal study that showed the proposed framework generalized across math and science: Compared to utility value, intrinsic value of math and science were more strongly associated with academic self-control in each subject. Collectively, results suggest that enhancing enjoyment of academics may encourage greater self-control.

    Highlights:

    In three studies, we used expectancy-value theory to understand academic self-control.

    Intrinsic value and utility value, but not expectancy beliefs, predicted self-control.

    Intrinsic value emerged as a stronger and more reliable predictor of self-control.

    Results suggest that academic self-control is a type of value-based choice.

    Enhancing enjoyment of academic tasks may encourage greater self-control.


  • Identifier: System Number: LDEAvdc_100068998651.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 0959-4752; 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2018.04.004
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): ELD Digital store

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