skip to main content
Show Results with:

Modelling alternative distribution set-ups for fragmented last mile transport: Towards more efficient and sustainable urban freight transport

Kin, Bram et al.

Case studies on transport policy. Volume 6:Issue 1 (2018, March); pp 125-132 -- Elsevier Ltd

Online access

  • Title:
    Modelling alternative distribution set-ups for fragmented last mile transport: Towards more efficient and sustainable urban freight transport
  • Author: Kin, Bram;
    Spoor, Joeri;
    Verlinde, Sara;
    Macharis, Cathy;
    Van Woensel, Tom
  • Found In: Case studies on transport policy. Volume 6:Issue 1 (2018, March); pp 125-132
  • Journal Title: Case studies on transport policy
  • Subjects: Transportation and state--Case studies--Periodicals; Transportation--Planning--Case studies--Periodicals; Transportation--Research--Case studies--Periodicals; Urban freight transport--Sustainability--Megacities--Modelling; Dewey: 388.05
  • Rights: legaldeposit
  • Publication Details: Elsevier Ltd
  • Abstract: Highlights:

    The model takes into account cost variables regarding the local (urban) context, receiver attributes and logistics processes.

    A case study on the fragmented supply towards nanostores in a megacity is conducted.

    The results demonstrate the impact of receiver attributes and local city characteristics on the efficiency of supply.

    The model can calculate the cost-effectiveness of distribution set-ups in other urban areas for different types of receivers.

    Collaboration between companies by sharing depots and vehicles has a high potential.

    Abstract:

    A mathematical model is developed to calculate the costs of alternative distribution set-ups for last mile transportation in a supply chain with small and fragmented volumes. The model is based on input from logistics cost models for urban areas combined with cost variables related to logistics processes, receiver attributes and local city characteristics. The cost variables for each aspect (logistics, receiver, city) influence the cost-effectiveness and applicability of an alternative distribution set-up. The model is applied on the delivery of fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) towards small independent retailers in a megacity. The current supply of these stores is characterized by high costs, inefficiency and unsustainability. Four different set-ups are modelled. The model shows the effects of different city and store request parameters. When drop sizes are low and distances are short, direct shipments with smaller vehicles outperform the current direct set-up. When drop sizes are low and distances are long, collaborating in an urban consolidation centre (UCC) shows a saving. The model can be further validated with data from other cities and other distribution set-ups.


  • Identifier: System Number: LDEAvdc_100057547313.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 2213-624X; 10.1016/j.cstp.2017.11.009
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): ELD Digital store

Searching Remote Databases, Please Wait