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Interplay between diet, gut microbiota, epigenetic events, and colorectal cancer

Bultman, Scott J.

Molecular nutrition & food research. Volume 61:Issue 1 (2017); pp n/a-n/a -- Wiley

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  • Title:
    Interplay between diet, gut microbiota, epigenetic events, and colorectal cancer
  • Author: Bultman, Scott J.;
    Espin, Juan Carlos
  • Found In: Molecular nutrition & food research. Volume 61:Issue 1 (2017); pp n/a-n/a
  • Journal Title: Molecular nutrition & food research
  • Subjects: Food Microbiology--Periodicals; Food Technology--Periodicals; Molecular Biology--Periodicals; Food--Biotechnology--Periodicals; Food--Microbiology--Periodicals; Food--Toxicology--Periodicals; Nutrition--Periodicals; Butyrate--Colorectal cancer--Epigenetics--Gut microbiota--Histone acetylation--Inflammation--Oncometabolites--Tumor‐suppressive metabolites--Warburg effect; Dewey: 664.0705
  • Rights: legaldeposit
  • Publication Details: Wiley
  • Abstract: Abstract :

    Diet and gut microbiota influence epigenetic events and colorectal cancer by multiple mechanisms. Microbiota convert dietary factors and digestive components into metabolites that positively or negatively influence cancer. These metabolites exert their effects in multiple ways including epigenetic regulation of gene expression as exemplified by butyrate functioning as an HDAC inhibitor. Gut microbiota also have a profound effect on immune cells, which influences colorectal cancer incidence and progression through the immune response. This is important not only for cancer prevention but also for cancer treatment as exemplified by recent work suggesting that probiotics will be a successful adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy.

    Abstract :

    Despite the success of colonoscopy screening, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common and deadly cancers, and CRC incidence is rising in some countries where screening is not routine and populations have recently switched from traditional diets to western diets. Diet and energy balance influence CRC by multiple mechanisms. They modulate the composition and function of gut microbiota, which have a prodigious metabolic capacity and can produce oncometabolites or tumor‐suppressive metabolites depending, in part, on which dietary factors and digestive components are present in the GI tract. Gut microbiota also have a profound effect on immune cells in the lamina propria, which influences inflammation and subsequently CRC. Nutrient availability, which is an outcome of diet and energy balance, determines the abundance of certain energy metabolites that are essential co‐factors for epigenetic enzymes and therefore impinges upon epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Aberrant epigenetic marks accumulate during CRC, and epimutations that are selected for drive tumorigenesis by causing transcriptome profiles to diverge from the cell of origin. In some instances, the above mechanisms are intertwined as exemplified by dietary fiber being metabolized by colonic bacteria into butyrate, which is both a short‐chain fatty acid (SCFA) and a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that epigenetically upregulates tumor‐suppressor genes in CRC cells and anti‐inflammatory genes in immune cells.


  • Identifier: System Number: LDEAvdc_100041754472.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 1613-4125; 10.1002/mnfr.201500902
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): ELD Digital store

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