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Psychosocial mediators of a theory-based resistance training maintenance intervention for prediabetic adults

Williams, David M. et al.

Psychology & health. Volume 31:Issue 9 (2016); pp 1108-1124 -- Routledge

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  • Title:
    Psychosocial mediators of a theory-based resistance training maintenance intervention for prediabetic adults
  • Author: Williams, David M.;
    Dunsiger, Shira;
    Davy, Brenda M.;
    Kelleher, Sarah A.;
    Marinik, Elaina L.;
    Winett, Richard A.
  • Found In: Psychology & health. Volume 31:Issue 9 (2016); pp 1108-1124
  • Journal Title: Psychology & health
  • Subjects: Attitude to Health--Periodicals; Psychology--Periodicals; Public Opinion--Periodicals; Clinical health psychology--Periodicals; diabetes--older adults--behavioural maintenance--theory--self-regulation--behavioural expectation; Dewey: 150
  • Rights: legaldeposit
  • Publication Details: Routledge
  • Abstract: Abstract :

    Objective: Examine psychosocial mediators of the effects of high vs. low-dose resistance training (RT) maintenance interventions among older (ages 50–69), overweight and pre-diabetic adults.

    Design: Participants ( N  = 123) completed a three-month supervised RT initiation phase and were subsequently randomised (time 1) to high or low-dose six-month unsupervised RT maintenance interventions (time 2), followed by a six-month no-contact phase (time 3).

    Main Outcome Measures: Online measures of putative mediators and RT behaviour.

    Results: RT intervention condition (high vs. low dose) had significant effects on change from time 1 to time 2 in behavioural expectation, self-regulation and perceived satisfaction ( f 2  = .04–.08), but not outcome expectancies, RT strategies or behavioural intentions ( f 2  ≤ .02). Change in each of the putative mediators, except for outcome expectancies ( f 2  ≤ .02), had significant effects on RT behaviour at times 2 ( f 2  = .12–.27) and 3 ( f 2  = .23–.40). In a multiple mediation model, behavioural expectation ( f 2  = .11) and self-regulation ( f 2  = .06) mediated the effects of RT intervention condition on time 2 RT behaviour, whereas perceived satisfaction did not ( f 2  = .01). Self-regulation was a significant mediator of intervention effects on time 3 RT behaviour ( f 2  = .11), but behavioural expectation and perceived satisfaction were not ( f 2  = .04).

    Conclusions: Findings suggest that behavioural expectation and self-regulation are appropriate targets for RT maintenance interventions among at-risk older adults.


  • Identifier: System Number: LDEAvdc_100035120267.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 0887-0446; 10.1080/08870446.2016.1179740
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): ELD Digital store

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