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The role of medication in reducing the negative effects of hyperactivity-inattention on achievement: A population-based longitudinal investigation of students and their classrooms

Martin, Andrew J. et al.

Contemporary educational psychology. Volume 55: (2018, October); pp 97-109 -- ScienceDirect

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  • Title:
    The role of medication in reducing the negative effects of hyperactivity-inattention on achievement: A population-based longitudinal investigation of students and their classrooms
  • Author: Martin, Andrew J.;
    Collie, Rebecca J.;
    Roberts, Christine;
    Nassar, Natasha
  • Found In: Contemporary educational psychology. Volume 55: (2018, October); pp 97-109
  • Journal Title: Contemporary educational psychology
  • Subjects: Educational psychology--Periodicals; Hyperactivity--Inattention--Psychostimulants--Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)--Achievement--Students--Classrooms; Dewey: 370.15
  • Rights: Licensed
  • Publication Details: ScienceDirect
  • Abstract: Highlights Focus on psychostimulants in reducing effects of hyperactivity-inattention (H-I) on achievement. Population-based study of student-level effects and a novel focus on class-level effects. Findings showed notable variation in H-I and psychostimulant use from classroom to classroom. At both student- and class-levels, psychostimulants reduced negative effects of H-I on student achievement. Findings add to the body of effective multi-modal psycho-educational interventions targeting H-I. Abstract The present study investigated the role of psychostimulants (methylphenidate, dexamphetamine; prescribed to participants for diagnosed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; ADHD) in reducing the negative effects of hyperactivity-inattention (H-I) on achievement through elementary school. Whereas the bulk of research investigating H-I and medication has focused on students (conducting student-level analyses), research into classroom climates and processes suggests this issue be examined at both student- and classroom-levels. The sample comprised 54, 165 Australian students (from 5419 classrooms) for whom H-I data were available in kindergarten and achievement data were available in year 3 and year 5. In preliminary variance components analyses, findings showed there was notable variation in H-I and psychostimulant status from classroom to classroom. In multilevel path analysis, at both student- and class-levels psychostimulants reduced the negative effects of H-I on student achievement, to a level where H-I had no significant negative impact on achievement. These effects were not moderated by dosage or psychostimulant type. Taken together, our findings add to the body of effective multi-modal educational and psychological interventions used to enhance the achievement outcomes of individual students who present with ADHD and—of particular note and novelty in this study—the classrooms to which they belong.
  • Identifier: System Number: ETOCvdc_100072150458.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 0361-476X; 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2018.08.006
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): 3425.181000
  • UIN: ETOCvdc_100072150458.0x000001

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