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The relationship between illicit amphetamine use and psychiatric symptom profiles in schizophrenia and affective psychoses

Voce, Alexandra et al.

Psychiatry research. Volume 265: (2018, July); pp 19-24 -- Elsevier

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  • Title:
    The relationship between illicit amphetamine use and psychiatric symptom profiles in schizophrenia and affective psychoses
  • Author: Voce, Alexandra;
    McKetin, Rebecca;
    Burns, Richard;
    Castle, David;
    Calabria, Bianca
  • Found In: Psychiatry research. Volume 265: (2018, July); pp 19-24
  • Journal Title: Psychiatry research
  • Subjects: Psychiatrie--Périodiques; Psychiatry--periodicals; Psychiatry--Periodicals; Methamphetamine--Stimulants--Primary psychotic disorders--Bipolar disorder--Substance use--Hallucinations--Delusions; Dewey: 616.89
  • Rights: Licensed
  • Publication Details: Elsevier
  • Abstract: Highlights Amphetamine use is associated with higher prevalence of specific psychiatric symptoms in those with schizophrenia. An equivalent association is not observed in those with affective psychotic disorders. Amphetamine may be acting on schizophrenia-specific dysfunctions to precipitate symptoms. Higher prevalence of these symptoms may underlie poorer outcomes in substance-using patients with schizophenia. Abstract This study examines whether illicit amphetamine use is associated with differences in the prevalence of specific psychiatric symptoms in a community sample of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or affective psychotic disorders. Data was drawn from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis. The Diagnostic Interview for Psychosis was used to measure substance use and psychiatric symptoms. Participants had used amphetamine within their lifetime and had an ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia ( n  = 347) or an affective psychotic disorder ( n  = 289). The past year prevalence of psychiatric symptoms was compared among those who had used amphetamine in the past year (past-year use, 32%) with those who had not (former use, 68%). Univariate logistic regression analysis indicated that past-year users with schizophrenia had a significantly higher past year prevalence of hallucinations, persecutory delusions, racing thoughts, dysphoria, and anhedonia relative to former amphetamine users with schizophrenia. There were no significant differences in symptoms between past-year and former users with affective psychotic disorders. The relationship between amphetamine use and specific psychiatric symptoms varies across different psychotic disorders. Amphetamine use may hinder prognosis by exacerbating symptoms of schizophrenia through dopaminergic dysfunctions or depressive vulnerabilities, however, this needs to be confirmed by prospective longitudinal research.
  • Identifier: System Number: ETOCvdc_100071111123.0x000001; Journal ISSN: 0165-1781; 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.04.015
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): 6946.263700
  • UIN: ETOCvdc_100071111123.0x000001

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