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Lack of striated muscle fibers in the longitudinal anal muscle of elderly Japanese: a histological study using cadaveric specimens

Kim, J. H. et al.

International journal of colorectal disease. VOL 30; NUMBER 1, ; 2015, 43-49 -- Springer Science + Business Media Part 1; (pages 43-49) -- 2015

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  • Title:
    Lack of striated muscle fibers in the longitudinal anal muscle of elderly Japanese: a histological study using cadaveric specimens
  • Author: Kim, J. H.;
    Kinugasa, Y.;
    Yu, H. C.;
    Murakami, G.;
    Abe, S.;
    Cho, B. H.
  • Found In: International journal of colorectal disease. VOL 30; NUMBER 1, ; 2015, 43-49
  • Journal Title: International journal of colorectal disease.
  • Subjects: Medicine; Biotechnology; Pharmaceutical Chemistry; LCC: RC; Dewey: 616.3
  • Publication Details: Springer Science + Business Media
  • Language: English
  • Abstract: Purpose and methods The aim of this study is to investigate variations in the longitudinal anal muscle (LAM), especially in the meeting pattern between the levator ani and rectum at the origin of the LAM. We examined the histology of the anal canal and the lower rectum of 50 cadavers (25 males, 25 females) of elderly Japanese individuals with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Results We observed two patterns in the meeting site between the levator ani and the rectum. In type 1, observed in 26 specimens, the smooth muscle-rich fascia lining the internal or medial aspect of the levator ani (i.e., the fascia pelvis parietalis or endopelvic fascia) was connected to the external muscle layer. In type 2, observed in 24 specimens, multiple intramuscular septa of the levator ani were attached to a smooth muscle mass, with the latter joining the external smooth muscle layer of the rectum. However, 21 specimens (6 type 1 and 15 type 2) carried few smooth muscles at the meeting site. We did not find any striated muscle in the LAM, although this might have been the result of age-associated degeneration. Thus, active traction of the pelvic viscera by the LAM seemed unlikely in elderly Japanese. Conclusions Rather than playing an active role, as suggested by the integral pelvic floor theory, the LAM seemed to be an elastic skeleton that maintains the shape of the anal canal.
  • Identifier: Journal ISSN: 0179-1958
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Accrual Information: Monthly
  • Shelfmark(s): 4542.172400
  • UIN: ETOCRN365422551

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