skip to main content
Show Results with:

On the Impacts of Traditional Chinese Culture on Organ Donation

Cai, Y.

The journal of medicine and philosophy : a forum for bioethics and philosophy of medicine. VOL 38; NUMBER 2, ; 2013, 149-159 -- Oxford University Press Part 2; (pages 149-159) -- 2013

Online access

  • Title:
    On the Impacts of Traditional Chinese Culture on Organ Donation
  • Author: Cai, Y.
  • Found In: The journal of medicine and philosophy : a forum for bioethics and philosophy of medicine. VOL 38; NUMBER 2, ; 2013, 149-159
  • Journal Title: The journal of medicine and philosophy : a forum for bioethics and philosophy of medicine.
  • Subjects: Medicine; Biotechnology; Pharmaceutical Chemistry; LCC: R723; Dewey: 616.001
  • Publication Details: Oxford University Press
  • Language: English
  • Abstract: This article examines the impact of traditional Chinese culture on organ donation from the perspective of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism. In each of these cultural systems, it appears that there are some particular sayings or remarks that are often taken in modern Chinese society to be contrary to organ donation, especially cadaveric organ donation. However, this article argues that the central concerns of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism are “great love,” “ren,” and “dao,” which can be reasonably interpreted to support organ donation. The author understands that each cultural system, in order to play its cultural function, must have its central concerns as well as relevant ritual practices (li) that incarnate its religious and ethical commitments. That is, each plays a general cultural role, which influences organ donation in particular not merely through abstract or general ethical principles and teachings, but through a combination of ethical teachings and the forming of particular ritual practices. This article contends that the primary reason Chinese individuals fail to donate sufficient cadaveric organs for transplantation is not because particular remarks or sayings from each of these systems appear to conflict with donation. Neither is it that the central concerns of these systems cannot support cadaveric donation. Rather, it is that modern Chinese individuals have failed to develop and secure relevant ritual practices that support the central concerns of organ transplantation. The article concludes that in order to promote more donations, there is a need to form relevant ritual practices supporting organ donation in conformity with the central concerns of these cultural systems.
  • Identifier: Journal ISSN: 0360-5310
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Physical Description: Electronic
  • Shelfmark(s): 5017.385000
  • UIN: ETOCRN329226530

Searching Remote Databases, Please Wait