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Introduction to nanoscience / Gabor L. Hornyak [and others].

Boca Raton : CRC Press, ©2008.

Online access

  • Title:
    Introduction to nanoscience / Gabor L. Hornyak [and others].
  • Contributor: Gabor L Hornyak (Gabor Louis).
  • Subjects: Nanostructures; Nanoscience; Nanostructured materials; Nanotechnology; Nanostructures; Nanosciences; Nanomatériaux; Nanotechnologie; Nanoscience; Nanostructured materials; Nanostructures; Nanotechnology; Electronic books;
    Dewey: 620/.5
  • Rights: Terms governing use: Copyright.
    Access restrictions: NON_PRINT_LEGAL_DEPOSIT
  • Publication Details: Boca Raton : CRC Press, ©2008.
  • Language: English
  • Description: Contents: Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Authors -- Section 1: Perspectives -- 1: Introduction -- 1-0: Nanoscience and nanotechnology-the distinction -- 1-0-1: Requisite definitions -- 1-0-2: Government line -- 1-0-3: Working definitions -- 1-1: Historical perspectives -- 1-1-1: Concept of atomism -- 1-1-2: Colored glasses -- 1-1-3: Photography -- 1-1-4: Catalysis -- 1-1-5: Integrated circuits and chips -- 1-1-6: Microelectromechanical systems -- 1-2: Advanced materials -- 1-2-1: Thin films -- 1-2-2: Fullerenes and carbon nanotubes -- 1-2-3: Quantum dots -- 1-2-4: Other advanced materials -- 1-3: Tools of nano -- 1-3-1: Electron microscopy -- 1-3-2: Atomic probe microscopes -- 1-3-3: X-ray spectroscopy -- 1-3-4: Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy -- 1-3-5: Lithography -- 1-3-6: Computer modeling and simulation -- 1-3-7: Molecular electronics -- 1-4: Nature's take on nano and the advent of molecular biology -- 1-4-1: Macroscopic expressions of natural nanmaterials -- 1-4-2: Cell biology --
    Contents: 1-4-3: Molecular biology and genetics -- 1-5: Nano perspective -- 1-5-1: Integration of everything -- 1-5-2: Scale of things and timescales -- 1-5-3: Grand challenges facing nanoscience and nanotechnology -- 1-5-4: Next industrial revolution -- 1-6: Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Problems -- 2: Societal implications of nano -- 2-0: Introduction to societal issues -- 2-0-1: Societal implications-the background -- 2-0-2: Breadth of societal implications -- 2-0-3: Meet the experts -- 2-0-4: Nano perspective -- 2-1: Ethical implications -- 2-1-1: Ethics in the context of research and applied science -- 2-1-2: Principle of respect for communities -- 2-1-3: Principle of the common good -- 2-1-4: Principle of social justice -- 2-1-5: You as moral agent -- 2-2: Legal implications -- 2-2-1: Interaction of law and nanoscience -- 2-2-2: Intellectual property -- 2-2-3: Civil liability issues -- 2-2-4: Evaluation -- 2-3: Environmental implications --
    Contents: 2-3-1: Nanotoxicology -- 2-3-2: Nanotechnology risk assessment -- 2-3-3: Environmental aspects of nanotechnology -- 2-4: Public perception -- 2-4-1: Factors influencing public perception -- 2-4-2: Nano and public opinion polls -- 2-4-3: Call for two-way communication -- 2-5: Future of nanotechnology -- 2-5-1: Cycles and patterns -- 2-5-2: Trend forecasting -- 2-5-3: Attractionary futuristics -- 2-5-4: Maximum Freud -- 2-5-5: Nanotechnology end points -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Problems -- Introduction to societal issues -- Ethical implications -- Legal implications -- Environmental implications -- Public perception -- Future of nanotechnology -- Ancillary problems.
    Contents: Section 2: Nanotools -- 3: Characterization methods -- 3-0: Characterization of nanomaterials -- 3-0-1: Background -- 3-0-2: Types of characterization methods -- 3-0-3: Optics and resolution -- 3-0-4: Nano perspective -- 3-1: Electron probe methods -- 3-1-1: Electron interactions with matter -- 3-1-2: Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis -- 3-1-3: Transmission electron microscopy -- 3-1-4: Other important electron probe methods -- 3-2: Scanning probe microscopy methods -- 3-2-1: Atomic force microscopy -- 3-2-2: Scanning tunneling microscopy -- 3-2-3: Other important scanning probe methods -- 3-2-4: Atom-probe methods -- 3-3: Spectroscopic methods -- 3-3-1: UV-visible absorption and emission spectroscopy -- 3-3-2: Infrared and Raman spectroscopy -- 3-3-3: X-ray methods -- 3-4: Nonradiative and nonelectron characterization methods -- 3-4-1: Particle spectroscopy -- 3-4-2: Themodynamic methods -- 3-4-3: Particle size determination --
    Contents: 3-4-4: Surface area and porosity -- 3-4-5: Other important characterizations methods -- References -- Problems -- 4: Fabrication methods -- 4-0: Fabrication of nonmaterials -- 4-0-1: Background -- 4-0-2: Types of top-down fabrication methods -- 4-0-3: Types of bottom-up fabrication methods -- 4-0-4: Nebulous bottom-up fabrication categories -- 4-0-5: Nano perspective -- 4-1: Top-down fabrication -- 4-1-1: Mechanical methods (mechanosynthesis) -- 4-1-2: Thermal methods -- 4-1-3: High-energy methods -- 4-1-4: Chemical fabrication methods -- 4-1-5: Lithographic methods -- 4-2: Bottom-up fabrication -- 4-2-1: Gaseous-phase methods -- 4-2-2: Liquid-phase methods -- 4-2-3: Solid-phase bottom-up fabrication? -- 4-2-4: Template synthesis -- 4-3: Computational chemistry and molecular modeling -- 4-3-1: History -- 4-3-2: General types of molecular modeling methods -- References -- Problems -- Section 3: Physics: Properties And Phenomena -- 5: Materials, structure, and the nanosurface --
    Contents: 5-0: Importance of the surface -- 5-0-1: Background -- 5-0-2: Natural perspective -- 5-0-3: Inorganic perspective -- 5-0-4: Nano perspective -- 5-1: Engineering materials -- 5-1-1: Metals and alloys -- 5-1-2: Semiconductors -- 5-1-3: Ceramic and glassy materials -- 5-1-4: Carbon-based materials -- 5-1-5: Polymers -- 5-1-6: Biological materials -- 5-1-7: Composites -- 5-2: Particle shape and the surface -- 5-2-1: Exterior surface and particle shape -- 5-2-2: Interior nanoscale surface area -- 5-3: Surface and volume -- 5-3-1: Geometric surface-to-volume ratio -- 5-3-2: Specific surface area -- 5-3-3: Spherical cluster approximation -- 5-4: Atomic structure -- 5-4-1: Crystal systems and the unit cell -- 5-4-2: Cubic and hexagonal systems -- 5-4-3: Packing fraction and density -- 5-4-4: Structural magic numbers -- 5-4-5: Miller indices and X-ray diffraction -- 5-5: Particle orientation -- 5-5-1: Surface polarization in metals --
    Contents: 5-5-2: Particle depolarization factor and screening parameters -- 5-5-3: Quasi-static limit -- 5-5-4: Orientation of nanometals in transparent media -- References -- Problems.
    Contents: 6: Energy at the nanoscale -- 6-0: Surface energy -- 6-0-1: Background -- 6-0-2: Nature -- 6-0-3: Introduction to surface stabilization -- 6-0-4: Nano perspective -- 6-1: Basic thermodynamics -- 6-1-1: Derivation of surface tension, y -- 6-1-2: Surface excess -- 6-1-3: Kelvin equation -- 6-1-4: Particle curvature and the Young-Laplace equation -- 6-1-5: Chemical potential -- 6-2: Liquid state -- 6-2-1: Classical surface tension -- 6-2-2: Capillarity -- 6-2-3: Surface tension measurements -- 6-3: Surface energy (and stress) of solids -- 6-3-1: Interaction pair potentials -- 6-3-2: Surface energy of low-index crystals -- 6-3-3: Surface energy of nanoparticles -- 6-4: Surface energy minimization mechanisms -- 6-4-1: Surface tension reduction in liquids -- 6-4-2: DLVO theory -- 6-4-3: Polymeric (steric) stabilization -- 6-4-4: Nucleation -- 6-4-5: Ostwald ripening -- 6-4-6: Sintering -- 6-4-7: Structural stabilization in solids -- References -- Problems -- 7: Material continuum --
    Contents: 7-0: Material continuum -- 7-0-1: Material properties and phenomena -- 7-0-2: Background -- 7-0-3: Nano (quantum) perspective -- 7-1: Basic quantum mechanics and the solid state -- 7-1-1: Ubiquitous particle in a box -- 7-1-2: Two-dimensional quantum systems -- 7-1-3: Schrodinger equation -- 7-1-4: Bohr exciton radius -- 7-1-5: Bandgaps -- 7-2: Zero-dimensional materials -- 7-2-1: Clusters -- 7-2-2: Metal clusters and the HOCO-LUCO -- 7-2-3: Optical properties of clusters -- 7-2-4: Other physical properties and phenomena -- 7-3: One-dimensional materials -- 7-3-1: Types of nanowires -- 7-3-2: Physical properties and phenomena -- 7-4: Two-dimensional materials -- 7-4-1: Types of thin films -- 7-4-2: Physical properties -- 7-5: Hierarchical structures -- 7-5-1: Importance of hierarchical materials -- 7-6: Quantum size effects and scaling laws -- 7-6-1: Scaling laws -- 7-6-2: Classical scaling laws and the nanoscale -- 7-6-3: Scaling laws for clusters -- References -- Problems --
    Contents: 8: Nanothermodynamics -- 8-0: Thermodynamics and nanothermodynamics -- 8-0-1: Background -- 8-0-2: Nano perspective -- 8-1: Classical equilibrium thermodynamics -- 8-1-1: Extensive and intensive properties and state functions -- 8-1-2: System, its surroundings, and equilibrium -- 8-1-3: Laws of thermodynamics -- 8-1-4: Fundamental equations of thermodynamics -- 8-1-5: Equilibrium constant and reaction kinetics -- 8-2: Statistical mechanics -- 8-2-1: Microstates and macrostates -- 8-2-2: Canonical ensembles -- 8-2-3: Energy (molecular) partition functions -- 8-3: Other kinds of thermodynamics -- 8-3-1: Onsager relations -- 8-3-2: Nonequilibrium thermodynamics -- 8-3-3: Concept of pseudoequilibrium -- 8-3-4: Cellular and subcellular systems -- 8-4: Nanothermodynamics -- 8-4-1: Background -- 8-4-2: Application of classical thermodynamics to nanomaterials -- 8-4-3: Small system thermodynamics-(the theory of T L Hill) -- 8-5: Modern nanothermodynamics --
    Contents: 8-5-1: Nonextensivity and nonintensivity -- 8-5-2: Nanothermodynamics of a single molecule -- 8-5-3: Modeling nanomaterials -- 8-5-4: Modern non-nanothermodynamics? -- References -- Problems -- Section 4: Chemistry: Synthesis And Modification -- 9: Carbon-based nanomaterials -- 9-0: Carbon -- 9-0-1: Types of carbon materials -- 9-0-2: Bonding in carbon compounds -- 9-0-3: Nano perspective -- 9-1: Fullerenes -- 9-1-1: Fullerene properties -- 9-1-2: Fullerene synthesis -- 9-1-3: Physical and chemical reactions of fullerenes -- 9-2: Carbon nanotubes -- 9-2-1: Structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes -- 9-2-2: Physical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes -- 9-2-3: Synthesis of carbon nanotubes -- 9-2-4: Growth mechanisms -- 9-2-5: Chemical modification of carbon nanotubes -- 9-3: Diamondoid nanomaterials -- 9-3-1: Diamondoids -- 9-3-2: Thin diamond films (and other ultrahard substances) -- 9-3-3: Chemical modification of CVD diamond -- References -- Problems --
    Contents: 10: Chemical interactions at the nanoscale -- 10-0: Bonding considerations at the nanoscale --10-0-1: Background -- 10-0-2: Intramolecular versus intermolecular bonding -- 10-0-3: Types of intermolecular bonding -- 10-0-4: Nano perspective -- 10-1: Electrostatics interactions -- 10-1-1: Ion pair interactions -- 10-1-2: Solvent effects -- 10-1-3: Ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions -- 10-1-4: Dative bonds -- 10-1-5: Pi-interactions -- 10-2: Hydrogen bonding -- 10-2-1: Standard hydrogen bonds -- 10-2-2: C-ax-H -- -O hydrogen bonds -- 10-2-3: Halogen bonds -- 10-2-4: Hydrogen bonds and living things -- 10-3: Van der Waals attractions -- 10-3-1: Contributions to the van der Waals interaction -- 10-3-2: Van der Waals radius -- 10-3-3: Physical property dependence -- 10-4: Hydrophobic effect -- 10-4-1: Background -- 10-4-2: Water and the hydrophobic effect -- 10-4-3: Amino acids and proteins -- References -- Problems.
    Contents: 11: Supramolecular chemistry -- 11-0: Chemistry of nanomaterials -- 11-0-1: Background -- 11-0-2: Types of chemical synthesis -- 11-0-3: Thermodynamic versus kinetic control and selectivity -- 11-0-4: Introduction to supramolecular design -- 11-0-5: Nano perspective -- 11-1: Supramolecular chemistry -- 11-1-1: Host-guest relationship -- 11-1-2: Molecular recognition -- 11-1-3: Synthetic supramolecular host species -- 11-1-4: Surfactants and Micelles -- 11-1-5: Biological supramolecular host species -- 11-2: Design and synthesis of selected supramolecular species -- 11-2-1: Thermodynamic and kinetic effects -- 11-2-2: Basic design parameters: the host, the guest, and the solvent -- 11-3: Extended supramolecular structures -- 11-3-1: Golden molecular squares -- 11-3-2: Synthesis of benzocoronene complexes -- 11-3-3: Helical supramolecular polymers -- References -- Problems -- 12: Chemical synthesis and modification of nanomaterials -- 12-0: Chemistry and chemical modification --
    Contents: 12-0-1: Types of synthesis processes -- 12-0-2: Introduction to molecular self-assembly -- 12-0-3: Introduction to chemical functionalization -- 12-0-4: Nano perspective -- 12-1: Self-assembly revisited -- 12-1-1: Langmuir-Blodgett films -- 12-1-2: Gold-Thiol monolayers -- 12-1-3: Organosilanes -- 12-2: Synthesis and chemical modification of nanomaterials -- 12-2-1: Synthesis and modification of zero-dimensional materials -- 12-2-2: Synthesis and modification of one-dimensional materials -- 12-2-3: Synthesis and modification of two-dimensional materials -- 12-3: Template synthesis -- 12-3-1: Macroporous template materials -- 12-3-2: Mesoporous template materials -- 12-3-3: Microporous template materials -- 12-3-4: Other interesting template materials -- 12-4: Polymer chemistry and nanocomposites -- 12-4-1: Introduction to polymer chemistry -- 12-4-2: Polymer synthesis -- 12-4-3: Block copolymers -- 12-4-4: Emulsion polymerization -- 12-4-5: Nanocomposites -- References -- Problems --
    Contents: Section 5: Natural And Bionanoscience -- 13: Natural nanomaterials -- 13-0: Natural nanomaterials -- 13-0-1: Nanomaterials all around us -- 13-0-2: Aesthetic and practical value of natural nanomaterials -- 13-0-3: Learning from natural nanomaterials -- 13-0-4: Nano perspective -- 13-1: Inorganic natural nanomaterials -- 13-1-1: Minerals -- 13-1-2: Clays -- 13-1-3: Natural carbon nanoparticles -- 13-1-4: Nanoparticles from space -- 13-2: Nanomaterials from the animal kingdom -- 13-2-1: Building blocks of biomaterials -- 13-2-2: Shells -- 13-2-3: Exoskeletons -- 13-2-4: Endoskeletons -- 13-2-5: Skin and its extensions -- 13-2-6: Summary -- 13-3: Nanomaterials derived from cell walls -- 13-3-1: Paper -- 13-3-2: Cotton -- 13-3-3: Bacterial fibers -- 13-3-4: Diatoms -- 13-3-5: Lotus flower -- 13-4: Nanomaterials in insects -- 13-4-1: Chitin -- 13-4-2: Chitin structures in insect wings -- 13-4-3: Butterfly wings -- 13-4-4: Color and structure -- 13-5: Gecko feet: adhesive nanostructures --
    Contents: 13-5-1: Gecko feet -- 13-5-2: Mechanism of adhesion -- 13-5-3: Attachment and release of grip -- 13-5-4: Self-cleaning -- 13-6: More natural fibers -- 13-6-1: Spider silk -- 13-6-2: Sponge fibers -- 13-7: Summary -- References -- Problems -- 14: Biomolecular nanoscience -- 14-0: Introduction to biomolecular nanoscience -- 14-0-1: Definitions: biomolecular nanoscience -- 14-0-2: Historical origins -- 14-0-3: Biomolecular nanoscience: roots in traditional science -- 14-0-4: Nano perspective -- 14-1: Material basis of life -- 14-1-1: Molecular building blocks-from the bottom up -- 14-1-2: Cells and organized structures -- 14-1-3: Viruses -- 14-1-4: Prions -- 14-1-5: Toxins and disruptive nanoparticles -- 14-1-6: Completing the circle from top down to bottom up -- 14-2: Cellular membranes and signaling systems -- 14-2-1: Cell membrane function -- 14-2-2: Ion pumps, ion channels, and maintenance of the cellular environment --
    Contents: 14-2-3: Transmission of neural impulses: action potential and K channel -- 14-2-4: Synapses and neurotransmitters -- 14-2-5: Hormones and regulation of cell growth and metabolism -- 14-3: DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis -- 14-3-1: DNA and RNA function and structure -- 14-3-2: DNA replication -- 14-3-3: DNA as a genetic information storage material -- 14-3-4: RNA and DNA nanoengines: viruses and phages -- 14-3-5: Role of the protein environment -- 14-4: Concluding remarks -- 14-4-1: Emerging concepts and developments -- References -- Problems -- Index.
  • Identifier: ISBN 9781420048063; ISBN 1420048066; ISBN (alk. paper); ISBN (alk. paper); BNB GBB7B0493; System number: 018393389
  • Notes: Bibliography note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource (xxxiv, 815 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color).
  • Shelfmark(s): General Reference Collection DRT ELD.DS.149581
  • UIN: BLL01018393389

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