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Performance and ingestive behavior of steers on integrated system using legume and/or energy supplementation

Tropical Animal Health and Production, Jan 2019, Vol.51(1), pp.205-211 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Performance and ingestive behavior of steers on integrated system using legume and/or energy supplementation
  • Author: Lisbinski, Eduardo ; Ronsani, Ricardo ; Wagner, Paris ; Farenzena, Roberta ; Stanqueviski, Fernanda
  • Found In: Tropical Animal Health and Production, Jan 2019, Vol.51(1), pp.205-211 [Peer Reviewed Journal]
  • Subjects: Bites ; Animals ; Pasture ; Bites ; Experimental Design ; Grazing ; Feeding Behavior ; Feeding Behavior ; Grazing ; Oats ; Chemical Composition ; Supplementation ; Cattle ; Body Weight ; Proteins ; Organic Chemistry ; Animals ; Corn ; Body Weight ; Body Weight ; Grazing ; Corn ; Design of Experiments ; Chewing ; Animals ; Legumes ; Mastication ; Corn Meal ; Oat ; Ryegrass ; Vetch
  • Language: English
  • Description: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a mixture of temperate and legume grasses with or without energy supplementation on the performance and feeding behavior of finishing beef steers. Eighteen Nellore-Zebu steers, average 23 months old and body weight (BW) of 380 kg, were used in a continuous grazing system, in a randomized block experimental design. Treatments were ORS: oat (Avena strigosa Schreb) + annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam) + supplementation with corn bran; ORVS: oat + ryegrass + vetch (Vicia sativa L.) + supplementation with corn bran; and ORV: oat + ryegrass + vetch. Evaluations were conducted on pasture (forage mass, sward height, herbage accumulation, botanical composition, and chemical composition) and animal (performance and ingestive behavior). Stocking rate and forage mass were greater in treatments with energy supplementation (ORVS and ORS), thus presenting greater sward heights compared to the treatment without supplementation. There was greater participation of oats and ryegrass when vetch was absent (ORS). The presence of supplement (ORS and ORVS) increased the presence of oat stem. The presence of the supplement caused the contribution of the vetch to be lower, likely because of the higher animal load of these treatments. The higher presence of vetch increased crude protein content in the ORV treatment. The ORS exhibited greater gain per area compared to the ORV. Supplemented animals had lower grazing and greater idle time. The ORS treatment animals spent more time in other activities and consumed supplementation and less time grazing than the other treatments. The absence of supplement (ORV) caused the animals to spend more time grazing. Animals not supplemented showed a higher duration of daily chewing, number of chews per minute, number of daily chews, daily number of bites, and station numbers.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 00494747 ; E-ISSN: 15737438 ; DOI: 10.1007/s11250-018-1678-4

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